Have a business card that sings

The business card plays a very crucial role in the first impression. The business card should sing well enough not only to impress but also to imprint on the reader’s mind your name and number so that when they need something that has to do with your profession, you are the first person that pops up in their mind.
The link provides some very innovative ways of doing business cards:
http://dailypoetics.typepad.com/photos/business_cards_and_other_/p1010063_1.html

Speed-up firefox

If you have a broadband connection (and most of us do), you can use pipelining to speed up your page loads. This allows Firefox to load multiple things on a page at once, instead of one at a time (by default, it’s optimized for dialup connections). Here’s how:

  • Type “about:config” into the address bar and hit return. Type “network.http” in the filter field, and change the following settings (double-click on them to change them):
  • Set “network.http.pipelining” to “true”
  • Set “network.http.proxy.pipelining” to “true”
  • Set “network.http.pipelining.maxrequests” to a number like 30. This will allow it to make 30 requests at once.
  • Also, right-click anywhere and select New-> Integer. Name it “nglayout.initialpaint.delay” and set its value to “0″. This value is the amount of time the browser waits before it acts on information it receives.
  • Useful outlook tip

    Quickly Peruse Related Messages. If you get a lot of e-mail, you’re familiar with the woeful feeling of wondering what was said before about any topic you’re currently reading about. You might even be wondering what you said about it if you said it a few weeks ago. For an on-the-fly look at all messages related to one you’re currently reading, open a message, select the Actions menu, choose Find All, and select Related Messages. A dialog will pop up and pertinent messages—sent and received–will be listed for you to review.

    Socrates and the palm reader

    Socrates once visited a palm reader. The palm reader looked at his hands and said to him: “so many undivine qualities you have: anger, pride, lust…”. His followers were furious — how could she say this about the great saint, Socrates?

    Socrates replied, “Wait, let us see whether she has anything else to say.” The palm reader continued, “Yes, he has these qualities, but, he also has them under his complete control.” Like all people, Socrates had negative emotions and qualities but he was able to prevent them from controlling him.

    Thinking out the box – NOT!!

    It’s not just about getting out of the box. Its about getting out, finding the right box and then getting into that box.

    Take a sheet of paper and write down everything you can think of that’s white. You have 15 seconds, go. Done? Good, now take 15 seconds and write down everything that is or could be in your refrigerator that’s white. Finished? Raise your hand if had better luck with the second list.

    Dan Heath, who co-authored the book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die with his brother Chip, started his talk at BIF-3 this afternoon by asking the audience to complete the exercise I described above. A good number (perhaps nearly half) of audience members were able to name more white things the second time around. But that’s an odd outcome, said Heath, because there are more white things that exist in the universe than in your refrigerator. The constraint, however, helped focus your thinking and made the task of identifying objects easier because of the stricter perameters.